Gel Electrophoretic Separation of Pineal Gland Proteins of the Iropical Rodent Funambulus pennantii

Authors

  • Pineal Research Laboratory, Centre of Advanced Study in Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi – 221005, Uttar Pradesh
  • Pineal Research Laboratory, Centre of Advanced Study in Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi – 221005, Uttar Pradesh
  • Pineal Research Laboratory, Centre of Advanced Study in Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi – 221005, Uttar Pradesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18311/jer/2016/18118

Keywords:

Electrophoretic Separation, Pineal, Proteins.

Abstract

The investigation of pineal-specific proteins is not new but offers scope for identification of antigonadotropic compound(s). There is difference in the activities of the reproductively active and inactive phase pineal homogenates of seasonally breeding animals, e.g., squirrels. The present study aimed at checking the squirrel pineal proteins adopting gel-electrophoresis technique. Homogenate of the reproductively quiescent phase pineal homogenate separated into 14 fractions whereas that of reproductively active phase pineal presented 17 protein fractions (3 additional fractions). It is assumed that these three protein bands (which were not noted for the squirrel in reproductively inactive phase) are responsible for the antigonadal/ antigonadotropic effect of the pineal gland. The present study, though very preliminary in nature, has brought out the difference in the pattern of proteins of two different phases of the pineal gland- reproductively active and quiescent. The data throw open scope for extensive biochemical studies to decipher the physical and chemical nature and the properties of an anti-gonadotropic protein.

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Published

2018-03-02

How to Cite

Arora, S., Sarkar, R., & Haldar, C. (2018). Gel Electrophoretic Separation of Pineal Gland Proteins of the Iropical Rodent <i>Funambulus pennantii</i>. Journal of Endocrinology and Reproduction, 20(2), 113–117. https://doi.org/10.18311/jer/2016/18118

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